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Fifteen Reasons to Read, and Church Library Books that Demonstrate the Reason

1) Books help you understand the universality of the world and the human experience. Reading helps you forge a strong local connection while feeling part of the entire world. (How to Rearrange the World by Todd Temple, God Has a Dream by Desmond Tutu)

2) Books take you to worlds you could never travel to. (Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George, Where God Was Born: A Journey by Land to the Roots of Religion by Bruce Feiler)

3) Books encourage curiosity, and teach you new ideas and better ways of living (Organizing Plain and Simple by Donna Smallin, The Kid’s Guide to Social Action by Barbara A. Lewis)

4) Books give you a broader world view so you aren’t trapped by provincial ideas without realizing it. (My American Adventure by Amy Burritt, The Diary of Anne Frank by Anne Frank, Islam by Philip Wilkinson)

5) Books give you something to think about and talk about with others. They make you more interesting and attractive to others because you can hold up your end of any conversation. (Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know –And Doesn’t by Stephen Prothero, The Wordy Shipmates by Sarah Vowell)

6) Books give you the knowledge to be able to express yourself with self-knowledge and authority. (The Expectant Father: Facts, Tips and Advice for Dads-to-Be by Armin A. Brott, Leading on Purpose by Eric Burtness, Supernanny: How to Get the Best From Your Children by Jo Frost)

7) Books allow you to experience dangerous situations safely. This is especially important for children, who must learn to identify dicey situations and avoid them. And adults can read a good murder mystery without actually being traumatized by such an event. (The Sunflower by Simon Wiesenthal, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas)

8) Books teach you to learn from the characters’ mistakes and poor choices, as well as identifying their positive character traits like courage and persistence. (I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust by Livia Bitton-Jackson, The Lilies of the Field by William E. Barrett)

9) Books teach us compassion, loyalty, and the keys to making and keeping friends. (Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo, Hoot by Carl Hiaasen)

10) Books enhance our imagination and creativity. (A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle, Path of Least Resistance: Learning to Become the Creative Force in Your Own Life by Robert Fritz)

11) Books teach us to recognize courage, and the moral power of doing right even if you are beaten before you begin. (To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Six Million Paper Clips by Peter W. Schroeder)

12) Books can lift or change your mood because they are a source of comfort and humor. (Matilda by Roald Dahl, Love Me by Garrison Keillor)

13) Books allow you to hear from a wide variety of voices and world experience, important for your spiritual growth. (Living Buddha, Living Christ by Thich Nhat Hanh, Reason for Hope: a Spiritual Journey by Jane Goodall)

14) Books allow you to safely explore negative human character traits like bigotry, violence, hatred, poor choices, and abuse. This helps you recognize them clearly in your own home, school, workplace, or in politics. (Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Keys to Dealing With Bullies by Barry E. McNamara)

15) Books teach you compassion, mercy, and clear reasoning. Books teach you to be who you are and to value yourself and others. (The Color Purple by Alice Walker, Breaking Free, Starting Over: Parenting in the Aftermath of Family Violence by Christina M. Dalpiaz, Is It a Choice? by Eric Marcus)

To find these books look them up in the card catalog alphabetized by author’s last name. Our hard copy card catalog is in the library on the counter. Our web catalog with book information and hundreds of my book reviews is at http://www.librarything.com/catalog/Epiphany-OviedoELCA. Aim to read 10 books this year. My goal is 50 and we will see if I reach it. I hadn’t started counting until now…..in golf I guess they call that a handicap?

 

Your librarian—Ginny Soskin

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